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Thread: Air to Coil Over Suspension Conversion

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Orange Park, FL, USA
    Posts
    152

    Air to Coil Over Suspension Conversion

    This write up and thread saved my life! http://www.landroversonly.com/forums...pension-68194/

    Well not really, but saved my LR3 for sure. I was eyeballing this conversion for the last year or so but not wanting to swallow the pill. After several attempts to resolve my ongoing "cross articulation" suspension fault to no avail, I decided to bite the bullet and finally tackle this conversion. I have a LR only indy shop nearby, they couldn't solve the fault. I have a dealer nearby, they couldn't solve the fault. I have done extensive research and also purchased LR specific software to recalibrate the suspension...also a no go!

    So I pulled the trigger about 2 weeks ago and bought the HEAVY DUTY conversion kit by Old Man Emu (OME) from Atlantic British. At the time, it was on sale $100 off, and I signed up for there whatever thingy and got another 10% off that, free shipping. I was going to do the job myself, requiring me to purchase about $300 in tools and gear, since I've downsized my tool chest about 2 yr ago. Plus an alignment +/- $125 for a total cost of $425.

    At the last minute, I decided to call a local shop to see if they could do it for me. My guy says yes, they do this conversion on Lincoln Nav's all the time. How much? $775 including the 4 corners, the splicing in of the ecu defeat box, and the alignment. SOLD!

    The install was a bit of a headache, but this linked thread was super helpful in providing some insight for the shop that did the work. Also, I have to say, the instructions provided with the kit were thorough and comprehensive. I read them with a fine tooth comb before dropping her off. When the shop struggled to get the red fault light off the dash, I asked them a few questions and that identified the missed step. 10 more minutes, wua-lah!

    Additionally, I was extremely happy with the quality and build of the parts from AB, really top notch stuff. So how do I like? I LIKE! A word of caution, the heavy duty kit will add at least 2" over the stock normal ride height. As previously mentioned in the linked thread, the standard kit will drop it 1" from the stock norm height. That was not an option for me since I already run over sized 32.5" BFG KO2's. But be sure to measure your garage clearances before to ensure fit post install. And the truck rides perfectly. No bucking bronco truck manners, just a touch tighter than stock. With the additional lift, I haven't lost any cornering confidence whatsoever. This is probably the best repair/upgrade/maintenance decision I've ever made for the 9 years I've owned this baby. I don't yet have any off road experience. But I did go through a deep swail the other day at an angle, and all four wheels were touching 100% of the time.

    If your wondering whether or not to do it...DO IT!!! About $1800 out the door for a 2" lift and never another suspension fault!
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    Brian

    06 LR3/D3 SE7, 275/65/18 BFG AT KO2's


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Livermore
    Posts
    927
    Quote Originally Posted by haverhill1 View Post
    This write up and thread saved my life! http://www.landroversonly.com/forums...pension-68194/

    Well not really, but saved my LR3 for sure. I was eyeballing this conversion for the last year or so but not wanting to swallow the pill. After several attempts to resolve my ongoing "cross articulation" suspension fault to no avail, I decided to bite the bullet and finally tackle this conversion. I have a LR only indy shop nearby, they couldn't solve the fault. I have a dealer nearby, they couldn't solve the fault. I have done extensive research and also purchased LR specific software to recalibrate the suspension...also a no go!

    So I pulled the trigger about 2 weeks ago and bought the HEAVY DUTY conversion kit by Old Man Emu (OME) from Atlantic British. At the time, it was on sale $100 off, and I signed up for there whatever thingy and got another 10% off that, free shipping. I was going to do the job myself, requiring me to purchase about $300 in tools and gear, since I've downsized my tool chest about 2 yr ago. Plus an alignment +/- $125 for a total cost of $425.

    At the last minute, I decided to call a local shop to see if they could do it for me. My guy says yes, they do this conversion on Lincoln Nav's all the time. How much? $775 including the 4 corners, the splicing in of the ecu defeat box, and the alignment. SOLD

    The install was a bit of a headache, but this linked thread was super helpful in providing some insight for the shop that did the work. Also, I have to say, the instructions provided with the kit were thorough and comprehensive. I read them with a fine tooth comb before dropping her off. When the shop struggled to get the red fault light off the dash, I asked them a few questions and that identified the missed step. 10 more minutes, wua-lah!

    Additionally, I was extremely happy with the quality and build of the parts from AB, really top notch stuff. So how do I like? I LIKE! A word of caution, the heavy duty kit will add at least 2" over the stock normal ride height. As previously mentioned in the linked thread, the standard kit will drop it 1" from the stock norm height. That was not an option for me since I already run over sized 32.5" BFG KO2's. But be sure to measure your garage clearances before to ensure fit post install. And the truck rides perfectly. No bucking bronco truck manners, just a touch tighter than stock. With the additional lift, I haven't lost any cornering confidence whatsoever. This is probably the best repair/upgrade/maintenance decision I've ever made for the 9 years I've owned this baby. I don't yet have any off road experience. But I did go through a deep swail the other day at an angle, and all four wheels were touching 100% of the time.

    If your wondering whether or not to do it...DO IT!!! About $1800 out the door for a 2" lift and never another suspension fault!
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    Thank you for posting this! I've often contemplated switching over to coils when the air suspension starts giving me trouble but so far (at 197K miles) everything works well.
    [/SIGPIC]Enrique, Susie, Sebastian 12 & Isabel 4yrs old.

    Mexxi's Restaurant & Catering.
    Catering to the farthest corner of the planet, in a Land Rover, of course!



    Land Rover stable:
    1962 IIA 109 Reg. in resurrection process.
    1992 RRC SOLD
    1998 Disco I with a peppy 4.6
    2006 LR3 HSE

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    377
    I'm really surprised the dealer and shop couldn't fix your cross-articulation failure. I have a theory...but I don't want to go down that road of re-hashing what is (at this point) a moot point, unless you want to hear it...out of curiosity.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Orange Park, FL, USA
    Posts
    152
    Quote Originally Posted by HOUM_WA View Post
    I'm really surprised the dealer and shop couldn't fix your cross-articulation failure. I have a theory...but I don't want to go down that road of re-hashing what is (at this point) a moot point, unless you want to hear it...out of curiosity.
    Yeah! I'd love to hear what you're thinking. For curiousity sake, and general knowledge as well. You'd actually attempted to help me when I posted my original cross articulation thread back in the end of 2015. After that troubleshooting experience, I just reset everything to factory settings to cure the headache. All was fine for about 9 months I guess. Then started getting fault every time I exceeded 30 mph. So I disabled the eas via the fuse pull. I had a recal done at both my shop and the dealer. The dealer ended up saying it was the right rear sensor. So we replaced that and had a recal. Kept getting the fault. The dealer says it's probably the wiring loom to that sensor. So basically I was already in this problem $410 deep with no resolve. I wasn't ready to drop another couple hundred on it just to see. That's the problem with the dealer here, the just want to throw parts at it until it goes away, or doesn't. So after a little more research led me no where, I made the jump to coil overs. What are your thoughts?
    Brian

    06 LR3/D3 SE7, 275/65/18 BFG AT KO2's


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    377
    Now I wish I could remember what I told you before!

    Cross articulation faults are almost always the calibration. That could be due to a bad sensor, or it could be some other element in the EAS chain. I had a scenario a while back in which my front passenger side airshock wore out and the upper control arm was bashing the cannister. (I hope you checked your shocks for this condition). Anyway once we changed the shock, the sensor and the wiring run on the other side (my bigger tires had tore it up) the dealership could not calibrate the suspension. This may have manifested itself as a cross-articulation fault or just looked wonky, I don't remember. ....but long story short the dealer couldn't calibrate it because it was SO FAR out of whack that their machines couldn't handle it. So, with the help of the GAP guys, I performed an iterative process where I first got it close to the right settings, then just did a full calibration. It was fine....for about two years. Around then my compressor was weakening and my sub-optimum calibration finally got exposed, and I got cross-art faults. I put a new sensor in (in my garage! Took 15 minutes) and it seemed fine. I went on an overlanding trip and didn't have any problems until I got back, at which point my compressor was done (that's how I know it was on its way out). Anyway....the dealer put in a new compressor and all that...but then I got another cross-art fault, if I recall correctly.

    Long story short, my calibration was off because the bracket holding the sensor was BENT! Probably from the time my shock went tits up and my control arm was coming down and striking the shock...it probably was hitting the bracket too and bending it slightly. After that, the tech "unbent" the bracket by carefully comparing it to other LR3s and such...the calibration "took on the first try" which was a good sign, and all seems to be good now.

    So, to summarize:

    1. I'd have looked at the shock cannister to see if there were dents.
    2. Look at the calibration values to see if they are good.
    3. Replace sensors and re-cal as needed.
    4. If calibration values are way out of norm, look for bent components.

    A few things to note here: the dealership had no idea how to calibrate the EAS when it was that far out of tolerance. They have fancy tools but sometimes they can get stumped. The GAP guys knew there was a bent bracket way back when it first happened, I just didn't want to hear it (I forgot to mention that). Only years later when we determined that it was bent did I go back and think 'holy $hit those guys were right!' and have the old e-mail to confirm it.

    Anyway, it's all spilt milk now; I hope the coil conversion serves you well.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Blackall Range SE Queensland Australia
    Posts
    333
    This is a most interesting thread ! I've known of other air-suspension LR3 owners on here who've fixed garage-can't-cope-with faults themselves .
    One guy was messed around for many weeks and ended up trailering his LR3 interstate back home and fixing it himself ! What the heck ..........
    Nothing would make me convert a suspension system , because of an undiagnosed fault . This is so much trouble it's not funny .
    Thanks for posting all this stuff guys :-)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    377
    Yeah, I love the EAS and think it's a fantastic piece of engineering....but one has to stay on top of it. Luckily after 12 years in service we finally know enough about it to do so. At the same time, I don't fault people who want to change to coils. I scoffed at that initially, but I don't know.

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